All About a Business Succession Plan

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As a business owner, you know that change is inevitable. From team members and company growth to overhead costs, consumer demands, and all things between, your organization is a dynamic entity – flexibly moving and adjusting as the market shifts over time. You have built a resilient company trusted by employees, investors, and customers. But what happens if you, the leader and visionary, decide it is time to move on? In a perfect world, business succession is a smooth transition where most customers and stakeholders are none the wiser about a significant difference at the top level. However, sometimes the leadership change needs to be sudden, maybe for personal reasons like illness or even death, and how do you ensure operations continue and your assets, family, and stakeholders are well-protected? A business succession plan needs to be in place, ready to be executed when needed. Without one, your security, integrity, company, employees, and investors are all at risk. So, what exactly IS a business succession plan, and what does it entail?

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Estate Planning: Your Guide to See-Through Trusts

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You are working hard – building wealth, utilizing retirement accounts, and maybe already talking with financial advisors. You have a clear path to the goals you set for yourself long ago – even if they may have changed a bit as life ebbs and flows. So, what happens next? We hear a lot about planning for retirement, but estate planning is equally important. The latter requires foresight, but it also ensures that your loved ones are taken care of and that your hard work now can still benefit them later. To efficiently protect your well-cultivated retirement assets from creditors, and distribute them to your chosen beneficiaries, a See-Through Trust should be explored and created. See-Through Trusts are a key estate-planning tool, but there are a few things you should know before moving forward.

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Post-Election Tax Strategies

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Now that tax season is wrapping up, we can all take a deep breath. With the pandemic looming over all of us in 2020, change has become the only thing we can consistently count on these days.

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The Importance of a Business Succession Plan

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It’s often difficult for us to think of the future as individuals, and even harder to think about it in terms of our larger counterparts, such as the businesses that we own and run. This is particularly true if it involves planning for the worst possible outcomes in our future, such as unexpected retirement, potential disability, or untimely death. When you build your own business and watch it flourish from the ground up, it can be disheartening to think of the possibilities of its disbandment or transfer to a new owner.

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New Year’s Resolution Estate Planning!

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It’s the new year and with that comes new goals! Usually, people vow to get in better shape or to save money for something big. However, we tend to start off strong and have no follow-through. Creating an estate plan is a lot like getting into better shape. We all know we should do it, but most of us never make it to the finish line because the task seems daunting.

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Changes to Estate Planning Due to Proposition 19

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In November’s recent election, California passed Proposition 19 (Prop 19), which has changed two important California property tax assessments that could have a lasting impact on your estate planning.

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No Clawbacks. The Time to Act is Now!

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In 2017, a window was opened. And at the end of 2025, that window will close. This breath of fresh air was granted by the passing of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) of 2017, which increased the Basic Exclusion Amount (BEA) from $5 million to a new base of $10 million (indexed for inflation after 2011) for gifts and inheritances bestowed from 2017 through the end of 2025. Though there are many motivations for lifetime gift-giving, it is often a strategy to maximize the value of wealth and inheritance while minimizing its subjectivity to taxation as much as possible. An estate tax is technically calculated as a combined value of lifetime gifting and taxable estate, but lifetime gifting also has the added benefit of removing the appreciation of the amount gifted from the value of the estate, so the incremental amount is not subject to the estate’s overall taxation. And of course, there are some gifts that are exempt from taxation altogether, like annual exclusion gifts of $15,000 or less per recipient and direct payments of medical expenses or school tuition. The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act has opened a window of gifting for those looking at federal estate taxes, but this legislation has an expiration date of January 1, 2026, at which time the $10 million bases will revert back to the $5 million base and the ability to take advantage of the increased estate and gift tax exclusions will cease. We are currently in an important opening of opportunity that should not be missed.

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The SECURE Act: How it Affects Estate Planning and What to Do

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With the introduction of the Setting Every Community Up For Retirement Enhancement (SECURE) Act in effect as of January 1, 2020, new and big changes have been made that affect one large aspect of retirement accounts: the payout process for beneficiaries. Previously, those who inherited someone’s retirement account were able to spread withdrawals from the account over the course of their lifetime. However, under the SECURE Act, beneficiaries are now required to withdraw all funds from an account within a 10 year period.

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